Archive for Health

Why Is This Treat So Good For Your Horse?

I’ve been searching a long time for a treat that is actually good for my horses. A treat that isn’t loaded with sugar or molasses, or grains which are mostly non-structural carbs which turn to sugar when metabolized, or soy, or hydrogenated vegetable fats or oils. We train with treats and use a lot of them. So I’ve been reading a lot of labels. Most of them are scary.

Which is why I’m so excited that I’ve finally found this treat. Read More→

More Winter Reminders – Water that Doesn’t Freeze, and More

First, I hope you’re feeding free-choice grass hay around the clock. This is a must because, in the wild, horses are moving and eating 12-18 hours a day. Their tiny tummies (comparatively speaking) need to be eating little bits of grass or grass hay pretty much all the time. This is especially important at this time of the year because grass or grass hay is the fuel that powers the horse’s internal heat engine. The only fuel. Nothing else helps the horse generate the heat needed to keep himself warm. Read More→

Why Supplement Omega 3s?

Because Omega 3s Are Essential for Your Horse

Every domestic horse on the planet needs Omega 3 supplementation because no one, not horse or human, can manufacture their own Omega 3s. A horse in the wild will get his Omega 3 needs from the many varied kinds of fresh native grasses that have never been exposed to chemical fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and never been GMO’d. Domestic pastures virtually always come up short because they have been heavily exposed to some or all of the above. Grass hay loses its Omega 3s when it’s cut and dried. Read More→

“Arthritis is an easy fix…”

“If anybody tells you that generation of new cartilage tissue is impossible they are lying to you. We do it all the time.” – Dr. Peter Glidden, ND

“46 million Americans have arthritis. They spend $128 Billion per year with MD’s that have no understanding or knowledge of how to cure arthritis. They only know how to manage it. Or operate on it. Yet, the July 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association reports that knee replacement surgery for arthritis doesn’t work. It’s a temporary fix, at best because it doesn’t fix the cause of the arthritis. It’s like painting over the mold in the basement. You can’t see it anymore, but it isn’t fixed.

“So what will fix it?

Read More→

I’ve Been Told My Standards Are Too High

JoeCashWalk2-4533Joe Camp, author of the National Bestseller The Soul of a Horse – Life Lessons
from the Herd; the horse’s #1 advocate for happier healthier lives

I’ve heard that a lot.

You set your standards too high.

Better than too low I’ve been known to whisper.

Usually I just shake my head and walk away.

Most recently I’ve been searching for a treat that is actually good for my horses. A treat that isn’t loaded with sugar or molasses, or grains which are mostly non-structural carbs which turn to sugar when metabolized, or soy, or hydrogenated vegetable fats or oils. We train with treats and use a lot of them. So I’ve been reading a lot of labels. Most of them are scary.

There is no such thing as a treat that is actually good for your horse. Get used to it.

That’s a quote from someone who’s supposed to know better.

But that’s not the way I believe. I’ve learned that when you dig deep enough, search long enough and question loudly enough, you’ll discover the most amazing things. Things that will make for happier, healthier horses. And find it I did! Read More→

Why Are These Horses Eating Hay?

StormMouse450

I love this photo. I’m not even sure why really. Maybe it’s because I know how much alike these two horses are. Our wild mustang baby Firestorm on the left and our rescued American Saddlebred Mouse on the right. I posted the photo just because I liked it. And I like them. Birds of a feather. Two very bright and very curious horses. One morning Saffron – Stormy’s mom – and I were walking out of the barn breezeway to breakfast. I had called both of them but realized I wasn’t hearing eight hooves on the pea gravel. I glanced back and all I could see of Stormy was a bit of her butt. She had stepped up into the tack room. All four feet! I wish I had thought to grab the iPhone but I reacted first (react first and think later… see I’m actually becoming one of them). “Stormy get outta there!” I snapped. And by the time I thought about taking a picture she was dutifully backing out of the doorway. We were having some grading and pea gravel work done around the barn and the guys had left a few big scary tools on the floor of the tack room. Like a chain saw. And one of those big concrete cutters. Scary to most, but not to Stormy. Oh, wow! Something new. What the heck is that? The small size of the tack room alone would be enough to cause most horses to vanish. But not Stormy. Nor Mouse if she had been around.

In the original post I called them the “children” of the herd. But that’s only true in spirit. Stormy is the youngest, 16 months at the time, but Stormy’s mother Saffron is actually the next youngest, and then Mouse at seven. But Mouse still acts like she’s Stormy’s age. Anyway, without realizing it, a friend named Jennifer posted a comment that caused me to shove the next morning’s work aside and write this blog post. Jennifer said, “That’s funny, eating hay with all that luscious looking green grass!” She must’ve been wondering why in the world would they do that? Read More→