Archive for Adoption

No Agenda Time – Join Up Without a Round Pen

Joe and Saffron

You might remember that, for me, the most important element in Monty Roberts’ Join Up is that the choice to join up, to trust, belongs to the horse. It is not forced by the human. And when the horse makes that choice freely, of its own free will, everything changes. No-Agenda Time takes longer than Monty’s Join Up (which usually works for him in 30 to 40 minutes). Our No Agenda experiment with our new mustang Saffron took 35 days, but when it happened everything changed, like a flash, right before our eyes. Everything! As if she had just flicked a switch. Read More→

“Share a rare intimate narrative and an extraordinary book.”

By Helen Underwood Miller

“This is an extraordinary book. Every horse will be ever grateful to Joe Camp for writing it. Buy it for your daughters, sons, friends, fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, vets, farriers, neighbors, hay dealers, feed merchants, the local breeders, the people who muck out at their stables, the people who rent trailers, the people who have horse rescue centers. Buy paper copies and leave them accidentally Read More→

Mouse

First day home. So frail and tiny.

First day home. So frail and tiny.

Not anymore! She's big... strong...

Three years later – Big and Strong!

Mouse Today

See the Video of Mouse
at Three – Two-and-a-half Years After Rescue

Below is an excerpt chapter from the book The Soul of a Horse about the adoption of Mouse from the Animal Rescue League of Iowa. The League rescued her and 13 other horses from extremely grotesque circumstances. She’s an American Saddlebred and was approximately seven months old when adopted, skinny and undernourished, and came to Monty Roberts’ Flag is Up Farms completely untouchable with hooves that looked to be out of a horror movie.
Read More→

Powerful Stories From Happier Healthier Horses Around the World

Rarely a day passes that doesn’t bring emails or posts heralding happier, healthier horses who have left their stalls, shoes, and sugars behind and are living the Wild Horse Model as closely as circumstances allow. Horses who now trust and forge relationship by their own choice, not ours. Unsolicited stories from people we did not know before they wrote. Many of whom had no way to do what they did but they put their minds to work and figured out how they could make their horse’s lives better. These stories are the fuel that drives us ever forward, learning and writing, to make a difference for horses everywhere. After reading just the few below, grouped together for the first time, Kathleen said to me, “When you first contemplated writing that first book, when you told me how important you felt these discoveries were and how much you believed that we should make an effort to get this word out, you said, ‘If just one horse-human relationship could be changed for the better, if just one horse could be living a happier, healthier life then the all the effort would be worthwhile.” She paused for a long moment and wiped away the beginnings of a tear. “Congratulations my Sweetie,” she said. “Mission accomplished.”

I hope you’ll open your heart and listen to what these horses have to say: Read More→

A Tale of Two Mustangs – Life Doesn’t Get Better Than This!

 

Barely an hour after Firestorm was born.

Saffron stepped off our trailer one fine St. Patty’s day, as an unhandled mustang, fresh from the wild, who had never willingly touched or been touched by any human. And she was very pregnant. We were told by the BLM that she would probably deliver in May. That was March 17th. Four days later, on March 21st, Miss Firestorm was born. Read More→

Confinement Weakens Bones in Horses


Skin and bones when we rescued her at 7 months from
an awful
confinement in Iowa. Now Miss Mouse is
a beautiful, healthy, happy young lady.

The Kentucky Equine Research Staff reports in a recent EquiNews that confinement weakens bones in horses.

“Bone is a dynamic, living tissue strengthened through use. Impact stress from moderate exercise—whether it’s a structured regime such as daily training or simply roughhousing in a pasture—encourages osteoblasts to lay down osteoid tissue, which is converted into healthy, resilient bone.

“When a horse does not exercise regularly, osteoids grow lazy, refusing to deposit substrate for skeletal renewal, and eventually mature bones will demineralize. Over time, demineralization weakens individual bones, which in turn reduces the strength of the entire skeleton. For maximal skeletal resiliency, horses should exercise daily, be it in a tailored training setting or just cruising in a pasture with friends.”

A horse in the wild will move anywhere from 8 to 20 miles per day. A horse in a stall, by study, will average only 800 steps per day. The equine body and brain Read More→